Posts Tagged ‘Art’

Wasted On The Young

April 17, 2011

I might actually be able to recognise an Australian accent now after watching this teen thriller.

The young and the fearless. Partying like there’s no tomorrow. Taking drugs like they were vitamins.

They have no worries except for being on the good side with the popular and powerful at their private high school. And the ones who happen to have other interests end up being drawn into the unreal world of the socialite. The only rules they have to follow are the ones set by them. There’s no adult supervision. No teachers, no parents and why didn’t anyone call the cops?

There were many moments of ‘what’s going to happen now’, holding the suspense. Then ‘really’, hoping there would be some morality, some justice, someone with higher authority would interfere. But no.

There’s a rape, beatings, more beatings, suicide and homicide.

With all the wrong-doings, Wasted On The Young is a work of art. It’s artistically made, how it’s filmed, the editing, the sound. Beautiful scenery, very modern, very high quality.

Unfortunately it won’t get the mainstream attention that it kind of deserves. I’m happy I got hold of a ticket for that special viewing!

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Black Swan

February 26, 2011

Very intense. It’s like sitting on needles. You think you’re going to be able to stand up and then someone pushes you down and you’re on the needles again.

Very intense. You’re holding your breath and you want to take a deep breath but the suspense comes back so quickly you’re holding your breath again.

Very intense. And it’s so beautiful yet so gory.

Black Swan, the one word that describes the film best is intense if you hadn’t noticed yet. Everything about it – the story, the characters, the music…

Not that I know much of the ballet industry but it feels like a realistic view of what it could be like. Very competitive, pressurised, filled with insecurities, which all have its consequences. Eating disorders, mental disorders, OCDs. Still, it may be prejudiced.

Happy I gave it up at the age of seven or was kind of forced due to circumstances but what if?

But, also, probably why I enjoyed watching this film so much. What if?

Natalie Portman was brilliant and if she wins the Oscar, she truly deserves it. So much better than Michelle Williams in Blue Valentine. But there’s a 14-year-old in the run too.

 

 

The Alchemist

February 6, 2011

It’s magical and at times you will forget that it’s fiction. Actually, I was probably hoping, really wishing for, that some of it was reality.

Still, it’s a wise story about a Spanish shepherd boy on a journey through the North African desert to fulfill his destiny. He meets many wise men along the way and the love of his life.

I read The Alchemist by Paulo Coelho for the first time for about ten years ago and remembered that it was the best book I had ever read. At least one of the best. I was about 17-18 and had no idea what my destiny was. At the time I probably thought I knew.

I still don’t really know what my destiny is but I like to think that I have a better idea of what it could be.

A while ago I found an abandoned bag with books near a train station and picked up The Alchemist. I had forgotten what it was really about. I’m sure it was a sign that I should read it again.

Santiago, the shepherd boy learns to see the signs and understand them. The story will open your senses. At least for a while. Until then follow your dreams. But when you search for it, it may take you far away for you to later realise that it was around the corner.

Next time my memory fades I hope to have found a copy of The Alchemist in Portuguese. It’ll be interesting to read it in its original language. Like films that are dubbed, are always different when you hear the actors real voices.

Once an it-girl, now an artist

November 22, 2010

Carolina Gynning. From it-girl, Big Brother-winner and glamour model to respected artist and TV-presenter. She surely knew how to use her ’15-minutes-of-fame’ right.

2004 was the year I moved from Sweden and the same year Carolina Gynning was on Swedish Big Brother with her platinum blonde hair and fake boobs. Six years later I move back. I turn on the television and the only thing I recognise  is her voice but I wouldn’t have known it was her if it wasn’t for the caption.

Gone was the long blonde locks and the silicon implants. And she was skinnier too.

On Friday, I was in central Stockholm with a dear friend, who also happens to be a Carolina fan who instantly recognised her work. For me it was, ‘oh, so this it-girl is painting now, don’t these celebrities try to do everything’.

But there was something interesting about those paintings, very colourful and they looked like self-portraits expressing different emotions. Even I could understand that.

Walking around the exhibition I got a good update and background information about Carolina so my attitude changed. I was a bit more positive toward this celebrity’s credibility.

As we were getting to the end my friend told me Carolina was sitting there. No, I didn’t recognise her. Next to her was her mother, also a famous artist, whose sculpture were displayed at the exhibition.

We walked around again so I could have another look at her. There was especially one painting that we paid extra attention to. One of a naked women with her legs spread out and a pig’s head covering her crotch. Carolina was happy to stand up and talk to us about her inspiration. Swine flu.

She was also having a hard time with men, male pigs, and as it was at the same time the swine flu broke hence the pig’s head.

She talked to us for about ten minutes, walking from one painting to another. I was very impressed and I could get through with my misconceptions of the bimbo image that had stuck to my mind. People change. I guess celebrities do too.

Waste Land

November 21, 2010

Meaningless art. Art is meaningless. It’s very easy to say that because we may not know better.

But really, it can be argued that art is all around us in different forms. Watching Waste Land has given me a better understanding of the arts I didn’t care much about due to being ignorant and disregarding of the fact that pieces of art has a person, a story behind it.

Not wanting to put much thought to it. Not wanting to explore it further feeling like it’s a waste of time.

Now, Waste Land is a documentary, a form of art that is more accessible to  me.

Vik Muniz, New York based Brazilian artist, went to Jardim Gramacho, the world’s largest landfill located in Rio de Janeiro, to see what he could create with the purpose of being able to give something back to the community.

I always get a bit skeptic when I see stories like this because of exploitation. The rich and famous using the poor to their benefit, giving away an image of being caring but are they really?

Vik, himself, came from a poor background that by chance got the possibility of better living standards so for me that gave more credibility to his purpose.

Vik got to know the workers and as he was spending time with them, photographing them his idea developed to use the garbage to create portraits of them with help from the workers. By getting the workers involved, Vik hoped he could make them see another side to life, at least for a moment.

 

It was amazing to hear the stories of the workers, how they had ended up working there, why they had chosen to do it and the pride they took in doing it.

“I rather pick garbage than get involved in the drug traffic or walk the streets of Copacabana.”

It was very touching and emotional. I got to see Brazil from a different angle, which was one of my expectations. See hard-working people aiming to live with dignity is not what always get portrayed in the media.

The portraits were exhibited and sold for a lot of money and Jardim Gramacho is due to close in 2012. And to believe the captions at the end of the film, the workers’ lives have changed and will continue to change for the better.

Unfortunately, it will still take me some time to understand the great financial value some people put on art, even though I consider my understanding to be a bit better.

In this case the money was to help the workers and the community of Jardim Gramacho, but when it’s not for charity?